Curatorial Advisory Group members appointed

Curatorial Advisory Group

Through our  exhibition programme, we seek to bring the best in documentary photography and film to the region and to our audience. Crucial to the success of AmberSide is a wide-ranging approach to the selection, programming, curation and delivery of the exhibitions we present and the accompanying engagement programme. Continuing in this mission, we are pleased to announce the appointment of the Curatorial Advisory Group (CAG).

The CAG includes experienced curators and representatives from across AmberSide as well as our new appointees. We are excited to introduce the following as CAG members:

  • Karin Bareman
  • Dean Chapman (Side)
  • Liz Hingley
  • Edwin Mingard
  • Jim Mortram
  • Bindi Vora

 

Karin Bareman (c) Riccardo Cavallari & Jacopo Emiliani, courtesy Autograph ABP, London

Karin Bareman
Karin Bareman is an independent writer on photography and audiovisual culture, a PhD candidate in photography at the University of Westminster, and an associate lecturer in photography at Anglia Ruskin University. Prior to her PhD studies, she worked for three years as curatorial project manager at Autograph ABP in London, and five years as assistant curator at Foam, the photography museum in Amsterdam.

In 2015, she was awarded the Milton Rogovin Research Fellowship by the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, Arizona, and in 2017 she obtained the Transfer North curatorial residency at the Northern Photographic Centre in Oulu, Finland. Her essays have appeared in magazines such as Camera AustriaFoam Magazine, Photoworks, Unseen Magazine, EXTRA, and Of the Afternoon, and on online platforms such as American Suburb X and C4 Journal. She also contributed the chapter on Dutch photography to The History of European Photography 1970-2000 Vol. III.

She has delivered various talks, including at Photofusion in London, and has participated in a number of panel discussions, including as moderator of The Space and The Book: The Publisher as Curator at the 2016 edition of Unseen in Amsterdam. She has also served as a juror on the Royal Photographic Society’s International Print Exhibition, on RedEye’s Lightbox Program, and on the LensCulture Exposure Awards. She has been a portfolio reviewer for the Kaunas Photo Festival and the Biel/Bienne Festival of Photography as well as an external examiner at the Fotoacademie in Amsterdam.

 

Dean Chapman
Dean is an experienced documentary photographer, and for a number of years has been part of Side Gallery’s curation team. In 1998 Dean won the European Publishers’ Award for Photography for his work in Burma. Exhibitions of his photographs have been shown in the UK, Italy, Bangladesh and Japan. He is a published photographer, Karenni, the Forgotten War of a Nation Besieged– an intimate portrayal of ethnic insurgency in Burma.

He has produced several extensive bodies of work about Japan including: ki.do.ai.raku which is a broad portrayal of the Japanese people, during the making of which he travelled to all of Japan’s prefectures; Shibuya Crossing surveys Tokyo’s most iconic intersection and it’s environs; Tsunami, the Archaeology of a Disaster chronicles Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami, examining the ways in which identity, culture and loss can be conveyed through photographic narrative.

In 1999, Side Gallery commissioned Dean to document communities in the former Durham Coalfield. More recently, he has been making films about Burmese exiles in the UK. He was a recipient of NEPN’s inaugural 2016 Develop Awards.

 

Photo credit: Sirkka-Liisa Konttinen

Liz Hingley
Liz Hingley is a photographer, curator and anthropologist born and raised in Birmingham, a UK city home to over 180 nationalities. Her work explores the systems of belonging and belief that shape cities around the world. Her practice is motivated by working collaboratively and creating connections between disciplines, cultures, audiences, eyes and minds.

Liz’s projects have received numerous awards, including the Lens Culture portrait prize, The PhotoPhilanthropy Award, Prix Virginia and Getty Editorial Grant. Her work reaches audiences around the world through publications, workshops and exhibitions, in locations ranging from galleries to gardens, from hospitals to streets. The book Under Gods (Dewi Lewis publishing, 2010), produced with the support of a two-year scholarship at Italian research and communication institute FABRICA, became an international touring exhibition. As a Visiting Scholar at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences Liz produced a further three photographic and academic books, End Of Lines (2013), Sacred Shanghai (Washington University Press 2019) and Shanghai Sacred (GOST books 2020).
As an artist and academic, Liz has held residencies and curatorial positions within the South Asia Institute at SOAS University, The Migration Research Centre, University College London and at the department of Art History, University of Austin in Texas. She is a research fellow at The University of Birmingham.
In her role at Side Gallery, Liz  curated exhibitions by Alys Tomlinson and Yan Preston in 2019. In 2021 she will curate shows by Chris Killip, Maryam Whalid and Poulomi Basu. Liz is also is a trustee of the AmberSide Trust.

 

 

Edwin Mingard
Edwin Mingard is a UK-based socially-engaged visual artist, and the winner of multiple visual arts awards. His  practice crosses film, video and installation. He has no formal arts education, but holds a Philosophy degree from the London School of Economics and Political Science. He curates moving image, and has founded collaborative organisations in the arts sector, including Deptford Cinema and Satellite, an artists moving image production company.

He is interested in who makes and exhibits moving image work, how, why, and for whom, and exploring ways that experimentation in the process can lead to individual and collective growth and change. This focus is also visible in the subject matter of his work, which explores and questions our social relations with one another.

His work has been commissioned by the British Film Institute, DocSociety, Arts Council England, Channel 4, the RSA, Wellcome Trust, Joseph Rowntree Foundation and others. Recently he was selected for Constellations (2019-20), a national, socially-engaged artists research programme curated by UP Projects/FlatTime House; was selected as one of 2020’s Bloomberg New Contemporaries; received a Jury Special Mention at IDFA (Amsterdam) and was longlisted for the Aesthetica Art Prize. His current moving image work, exploring the effects of the UK’s border regime on east London, is currently in production.

 

Photo credit: Jim Mortram

Jim Mortam
Jim Mortram lives near Dereham, a small town in Norfolk. Dereham is no different from thousands of other communities throughout Britain, where increasing numbers of people struggle to survive at a time of welfare cuts and failing health services.

For over seven years, Jim has been photographing the lives of people in his community who, through physical and mental problems and a failing social security system, face isolation and loneliness in their daily lives. His work covers difficult subjects such as disability, addiction and self-harm, but is always with hope and dignity, focusing upon the strength and resilience of the people he photographs.

 Small Town Inertia is a remarkable body of work. A full-time carer for his mother, Jim is, like his subjects, unable to escape from the geographical confines of his hometown and his understanding and sympathy for his struggling neighbours is apparent in every photograph.

This is a timely book; a firm rebuttal of damaging government welfare policies and their well-used rhetoric that ‘we are all in this together.’

 

 

Photo credit: Laura Hensser for iheartwomen.co.uk

Bindi Vora
Bindi Vora is an artist, curator and Curatorial Projects Manager at Autograph, London. Her recent curatorial project Poulomi Basu: Centralia was jointly awarded the Rencontres d’Arles – Louis Roederer Discovery Award jury prize 2020. Since joining Autograph Vora has co-curated solo exhibitions including Lola Flash: [sur]passing and Maxine Walker: Untitled. Most recently initiating a new series of artist conversations for Autograph which have included multidisciplinary artists such as Monica Alcazar Duarte, Maryam Wahid and Tobi Alexandra Falade amongst others. Prior to her post at Autograph she held a curatorial position at the Hayward Gallery organising the exhibition of South Korean artist Lee Bul and their inaugural billboard commission by artist Njideka Akunyili Crosby. She has also worked at The Photographers’ Gallery curating their offsite commissions which included the international touring exhibition Work, Rest & Play: British Photography from the 1960s to Today, In Fine Feather at Selfridges London, In Your Face at Liberty London, amongst other initiatives. Her writing has appeared in Foam Magazine, Loose Associations: Vol.2 Issue IILee Bul: Crashing; Vora has contributed to public programmes at London Art Fair, GRAIN Photography Hub and The Photographers’ Gallery where she was recently in conversation with renowned transmedia artist and activist Poulomi Basu. She is a regular visiting lecturer at the University of Westminster.

As an artist her works have appeared in a variety of exhibitions at Yinka Shonibare’s Guest Projects; 180 The Strand; Victoria & Albert Museum of Childhood, amongst others; being named as “one to watch” by The Wick Culture in 2021. Her photographic works are included in the public collection of Imperial Health Charity.

www.bindivora.co.uk / www.autograph.org.uk

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